The beautiful struggle

I’ve made many decisions since I opened my first affiliate. Some have worked out better than others, but all of them have helped shape the person I am today. At the young age of 25, I thought I knew what it took to run a successful gym. My idea in a nutshell: I would buy a bunch of barbells, show off my degree (in my mind it lent me a lot more credibility than I actually had), and get a bunch of people to come workout (didn’t know how I’d manage this part mind you) and then……success (lol).I’ve spent most of my career in the fitness industry learning (sometimes the hard way) trying, reconfiguring, trying again – until I strike the right balance, send the right message, find the right flow, whatever the case may be.

At times, I worried that I was clueless, that I was just a kid who liked CrossFit, and that I’d never cut it as an actual affiliate owner. At first, I kept going out of sheer stubbornness. There was no way I was going to fail in front of my friends and family (FYI: This is a terrible reason to do anything, please, if you take anything away from this article, do not use that as your reasoning).
After a while, I realized that the fear of failure and disappointment wasn’t my real “why”. Sure, nobody likes to fall flat on their face, but I soon recognized my real reason for getting into CrossFit professionally was simple: I wanted to help people.

As soon as I came to this realization, everything became crystal clear. Did I struggle still? You bet your ass I did. I still struggle, and I will admit that I have yet to find the right balance between work and life (outside of the gym). I get worn out, and I have plenty of days where I’m stressed.
I’ve begun to accept that gym ownership will always be a struggle, but I’ve realized that this struggle, this process, is something I’ve fallen in love with. Seeing a member of IronBorn get their first pull up, or discovering their own confidence for the first time, or watching them grow as an athlete and a person, is amazing, and I’ll gladly toil day and night to experience it.

The reason why I share my story with you all is because I want you to compare this life cycle of gym ownership to your own life cycle as an athlete. CrossFit, or being fit in general, can be a battle. Weights that feel light one day can feel impossibly heavy the next. Personal bests go from an every day event to a rarity. Life happens; you miss the gym some days and others you decide not to go because your couch looks better. Yes, there will be peaks and valleys, good days and hard days. Remember, good days are there to test your body and hard days are there to challenge your mind.

In other words, you will struggle. I’ve been there too, it can suck. When you catch yourself in one of these moments, remember this: your struggle is beautiful. Investing in you and driving yourself to be better is beautiful and there will always be obstacles to being a fitter, healthier you.
Fitness is a lifelong endeavor; be patient with yourself, trust the process, and fall in love with the struggle. The struggle, the resistance of the process is there to help shape you into something more than you are, to build you up by breaking you down, rep by rep, workout by workout.

The next time we find ourselves grinding, battling through a workout, look within: we’ve been here before, we know we can push through. a few years ago, a few months ago for some of us, we would have stopped, said “I can’t” and spent the rest of your week kicking ourselves for giving up. Not now, the struggle, the resistance, whatever you’d like to call it, has made us stronger, not just in body, but in spirit as well.

 

11755645_926955154009489_5673435983674427561_n

Announcements

A. Warm Up

  • 3 Slow Rounds
  • 10 Back Extensions
  • 15 Band Pull Aparts
  • 20 Double Unders

B. Strength

  • Power Snatch
  • 5 mins to establish a heavy single hang power snatch
  • 5 mins to establish a heavy single hang power snatch from below the knee
  • 5 mins to establish a heavy single power snatch from the ground

C. Met-Con

  • “Mind Eraser”
  • AMRAP 20:
  • 7 Power Cleans (135/95)
  • 7 Burpees
  • 200m Run